An analysis of bassanio and the casket test

On the surface, he is largely selfish and extravagant, initially wanting to marry Portia for her money, but eventually, we see his instead a more charming youthful enthusiasm and growing love for Portia beyond her financial means. Maybe Bassanio isn't such a bad person, but rather, he just needs to mature more. Expert Answers Karen P.

An analysis of bassanio and the casket test

On the surface, he is largely selfish and extravagant, initially wanting to marry Portia for her money, but eventually, we see his instead a more charming youthful enthusiasm and growing love for Portia beyond her financial means. Expert Answers Karen P.

He has considerable bad qualities but he also has considerable good qualities, although the good ones may not be of a nature that they can counterbalance the bad. First, Bassanio is a reckless youth with no wisdom or thought for the future.

He has spent whatever fortune he had instead He has spent whatever fortune he had instead of living within the scope of his financial means. We know this because he is staking his chance of recouping his lost fortune on a gamble that he will be the one to choose the right casket a small chest or box for valuables that will win the hand of the heiress Portia in a strange matrimonial test set up by her late father.

In these dire straits--no money; in love with a rich girl who is guarded in marriage by a casket-selecting contest--he pleads with his devoted friend Antonio to loan him money with which he can put on a show, a pretense, of wealth to impress the fair Portia.

There is nothing reckless in turning to ask a friend for help, but when the friend is in tight financial straits himself it does appear reckless to press the point of a loan.

He has the energy and enthusiasm of youth. He is devoted in his admiration for Portia. He is a staunch and loyal friend. Bassanio offers his own hand, head or heart in place of the pound of flesh that is due to Shylock to be cut from Antonio. So in opposition to his bad qualities, Bassanio offers true friendship; true loyalty; true love; true devotion.

How can I better understand The Merchant of Venice? Want to add to the discussion? Your Venice All Questions Answered.
SparkNotes: The Merchant of Venice: Plot Overview Next Portia We first hear of her when described by Bassanio as rich, beautiful and full of wondrous virtues.
The Merchant of Venice Quiz Shylock is hesitant about lending Bassanio the money. He knows for a fact that Antonio is a rich man, but he also knows that all of Antonio's money is invested in his merchant fleet.

It is debatable as to whether these highly laudable qualities counterbalance impetuosity, imprudence, immoderation; extravagance of idea and living; and frivolity.

If these bad traits are nothing more than the scourge of youth, Bassanio has the makings of an admirable man.Summary Bassanio seeks out Shylock, a Jewish moneylender, for a loan of three thousand ducats on the strength of Antonio's credit.

Shylock is hesitant about len.

William Shakespeare

Bassanio selects the Lead Casket He fears that he will never get to enjoy her and marry her. Bassanio is eager to try his luck on the boxes and Portia gives up on trying to convince him to put it off, and she says if he selects the wrong casket, her "eye shall be the stream and watery deathbed for him" ().

Bassanio - A gentleman of Venice, and a kinsman and dear friend to Antonio. Bassanio’s love for the wealthy Portia leads him to borrow money from Shylock with Antonio as his guarantor. An ineffectual businessman, Bassanio proves himself a worthy suitor, correctly identifying the casket .

A short summary of William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. This free synopsis covers all the crucial plot points of The Merchant of Venice.

Character List

A list of all the characters in The Merchant of Venice. The The Merchant of Venice characters covered include: Shylock, Portia, Antonio, Bassanio, Gratiano, Jessica, Lorenzo, Nerissa, Launcelot Gobbo, The prince of Morocco, The prince of Arragon, Salarino, Solanio, The duke of Venice, Old Gobbo, Tubal, Doctor Bellario, Balthasar.

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An analysis of bassanio and the casket test
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